The Year 2017 in Reading: 35 Books (The Bronze Books)

When challenged to read books in 2017, I joined friends who had set individual targets  based on their interest level and the challenges life had in front of them. Three friends proposed to read 15 books. Three really ambitious readers proposed reading 50 books, 60 books, and 75 books in succession with varying degrees of reported success. In fact, I had one friend that reported reading a few hundred pages per day to the tune of 379 books read.

In joining a friend in the aim to read 24 books, or two books per month, we both exceeded our goal by landing in the thirty-plus books range. On a rating scale of 1-star to 5-stars, Matt with Matt Lynn Digital rated the 35-books mostly as worthy reads.

Five (5) books landed with ratings of less than average, which is to say at 3.25-stars or less.  Eleven (11) books landed at average with a rating of 3.5-stars while one (1) landed at slightly above average with 3.75-stars. These seventeen (17) books will be collected into this remembrance of 2017. Simply follow the links for a fuller review of any particular book.

Ranking as above average at 3.75 stars in 2017 included this one (1) book:

Having written in a style reminiscent of Agatha Christie, I particularly liked the notion of there being two mysteries in a single book to unravel. One might remember that I spent an entire blog post in 2016 reviewing the Agatha Christie books read in 2016.

Magpie Murders 1

Ranking as average at 3.5 stars in 2017 included these eleven (11) books:

I stayed mostly in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with these books, with Candide being the notable exception.

Candide 1

Ranking as just below average at 3.25 stars in 2017 included this one (1) book:

Live By Night 1

Ranking as slightly below average at 3.0 stars in 2017 included these three (3) books:

My ranking of James Joyce came as the biggest disappointment here as I had hoped for something that would resonate more fully with me. Perhaps the larger issue here was my coming to the book in my forties rather than as a younger man.

ulysses

Ranking lowest at 2.50 stars in 2017 included this book:

That final book lands in the pulp fiction genre; the book itself was recommended by Stephen King, whose writing has some quirks to it though has been entertaining to me. The bottom line for this book for me is to realize that not all influences to authors that entertain me are books that I would want to read.

At the Mountains of Madness 1

The above listing of books reflects the bronze listing of books. A silver and gold listing will follow shortly.

Matt – Friday, December 29, 2017

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Anthony Horowitz colors me intrigued with ‘Magpie Murders’

Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz is a 2016 United Kingdom released mystery and thriller that made its way to a United States release in 2017. The immediate intrigue to this work was that the story reputedly played in the same realm as an Agatha Christie novel.  That the story takes a turn towards being the story of who killed who wrapped around an unfinished book dealing in similar subject matter colored me intrigued right from the start.

The central characters, only the second of which we get to meet really well, are fictional mystery writer Alan Conway as well as his editor, Susan Ryeland. In the embedded book, the champion detective is Atticus Pünd looks to solve a murder at Pye Hall within a sleepy English village circa the 1950s. You get a good sense for where the story is going when, at the moment of revelation, things take a turn that suggests that the manuscript has been changed. With the death of the author Conway, Ryeland is cast into the role of getting to the bottom of determining what happened while facing what turns into a real time thriller for herself.

Magpie Murders 2(Anthony Horowitz)

If you like puzzles as well as novels in the detective genre, you will be quite happy with Magpie Murders. As to why Horowitz chose to set his book in the 1950s rather than something more contemporary, the author had some clear thoughts on why.  Roslyn Sulcas in a review of Magpie Murders in The New York Times on June 8, 2017 leads to Sulcas quoting Horowitz.

“He placed the Conway novel in the 1950s, he said, because he likes murder mysteries that are “forensic free,” without surveillance cameras and DNA. “I want sprinklings of clues and red herrings,” he said. “And having no mobile phones is wonderfully helpful; it slows the pace down, and you have more time for atmosphere and character.””

I give Magpie Murder 3.75-stars out of 5.

Matt – Thursday, October 19, 2017