Jon Krakauer documents acquaintance rape enablement in the book ‘Missoula’

Jon Krakauer documents a dominant and judicial culture that enables acquaintance rape in the book Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town.  As indicated in the preface summary for Missoula on Goodreads, “Krakauer documents the experiences of five victims…These stories cut through abstract ideological debate about acquaintance rape to demonstrate that it does not happen because women are sending mixed signals or seeking attention. They are victims of a terrible crime, deserving of fairness from our justice system.”

Missoula 2 (Jon Krakauer)

My perspective as a male reading this book is that the book is fairly researched, even handed to those suffering at the hands of rapists while also fair in pointing out culpability of different systems of investigating and judging guilt, innocence, and the correct courses of action for those accused of rape in a college setting. Many in the Missoula County Attorneys Office, the University of Montana, and the Missoula city police department strike me as frighteningly unaware and deliberately obsessed with taking a severely unsympathetic to the legitimate sensitivities of the victims of sexual contact without consent.

Emily Bazelon in her April 28, 2015 review of Missoula for The New York Times, under title Jon Krakauer’s ‘Missoula,’ About Rape in a College Town, takes a less flattering view. Quoting from her review:

“Instead of delving deeply into questions of fairness as universities try to fulfill a recent government mandate to conduct their own investigations and hearings — apart from the police and the courts — Krakauer settles for bromides. University procedures should “swiftly identify student offenders and prevent them from reoffending, while simultaneously safeguarding the rights of the accused,” he writes, asserting that this “will be difficult, but it’s not rocket science.””

The book is intense, graphic, and at times quite emotional for both of those reasons. Imagery had to be all those things to truly remove address much of what is taboo or mysterious for people when it comes to crimes against intimacy, trust, and gender. Part of what cannot wring true for ladies reading this assessment, that of a male, is that I have many of the same blind spots about ladies that female reviewers of the book, including Emily Bazelon, readily know and identify. Sharing wisdom taken from Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence–from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror by Judith Lewis Herman strikes me as an excellent educational means to illuminate some of that blindness with knowledge.

Missoula 3 (Judith Lewis Herman about enabling rape)

For those familiar with Krakauer‘s work, I see Missoula as aligning more closely in intimacy and narrative tone to Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith or Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman than Into the Wild.

Overall, the presentation was clearly and forthrightly told. The book is lucid throughout, though perhaps less synthesized from a first person narrative accounting of many ladies. My rating for the book is 4-stars out of 5 stars.

Matt – Tuesday, July 4, 2017

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Author: Matt and Lynn Digital Blog

Matt and Lynn are a couple living in the Midwest of the United States.

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